Amasi

Jennifer Ezeokoli
Jennifer Ezeokoli
Jennifer is a food enthusiast, Writer/Content Creator. Driven by passion, as the Head of content for African Food Network, she strives to curate exciting, fun, informative and functional content.
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Amasi is fermented milk in a calabash. This local dairy beverage originates from South Africa and it is known by the names maas in Afrikaans, Magege in Tsonga, and mafi in Sesotho.

This popular milk beverage, which tastes like cottage cheese or plain yogurt, is traditionally made by fermenting unpasteurized cow’s milk in a calabash or container and separating the water, known as Umlaza, from the thick liquid, known as amasi.

It is fermented milk, derived primarily from cattle but also from goats, is high in probiotics, and is a great source of calcium, Vitamin E, iron, magnesium, and protein. It’s usually served over a Mealie meal (pap) or eaten straight from a calabash with wooden spoons.

What is Amasi Made of?

It is typically made by fermenting unpasteurized cow’s milk in a calabash container or hide bag. The fermenting milk produces a watery fluid known as umlaza, with the remainder becoming amasi.

This thick liquid is mostly poured over mealie meal porridge called pap. It is traditionally served in a clay pot with wooden spoons and eaten, although it can also be sipped.

Is Amasi The Same As Buttermilk?

Buttermilk is produced in the same manner as maas, but with a slightly different culture. Cultured buttermilk is another name for commercially produced buttermilk. Cultured buttermilk is not the same as the natural result of butter making.

How To Preserve Amasi

When this fermented milk product is ready for consumption, it is usually served with pap or eaten on its own, and it does not usually store for a long period of time, though refrigerators are available these days and it can be stored for a longer period of time in the refrigerator.

Is Amasi Healthy?

This fermented milk has the potential to improve gastrointestinal health. It contains probiotics, which can help to enhance digestive health and alleviate common difficulties like bloating and constipation. It can also help to strengthen a person’s immune system.

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amasi

Amasi

Avatar photoJennifer Ezeokoli
Amasi is popularly known by the name maas in Afrikaans, Magege in Tsonga language, mafi in Sesotho,  The Amasi is fermented milk in a calabash. This popular milk beverage that tastes like cottage cheese or plain yogurt traditionally prepared by storing unpasteurised cow's milk in a calabash or container till it ferments and separating the water called Umlaza and the thick liquid which is the amasi.
Prep Time 2 days
Cook Time 2 hours
Total Time 2 days 2 hours
Course Drinks

Equipment

  • Plastic Spoon
  • Glass Jar
  • Coffee Filter
  • Rubber Band

Ingredients
  

  • 2 tbsp Amasi Starter Culture
  • 500 ml Organic full fat milk

Instructions
 

  • Pour the Amasi starter culture into the clean glass jar.
  • Add milk into the jar.
  • Stir properly, there is no need for electric mixer.
  • Cover the mixture with a muslin cloth or coffee filter and secure with rubber band.
  • Store in a room temperature of about 20-25C out of direct sunlight and direct heat source.
  • Store for about 12-24 hours or more till the sets like gelatine. The best way to find out is by tilting the jar, it should firmly pull away from the side of the jar as a single mass.
  • Once it set, cover and refrigerate for 7 hours. Do not stir.
  • Serve in a calabash with wooden spoon.
Keyword Amasi
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Jennifer Ezeokoli
Jennifer Ezeokoli
Jennifer is a food enthusiast, Writer/Content Creator. Driven by passion, as the Head of content for African Food Network, she strives to curate exciting, fun, informative and functional content.
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