ginger

image source: medicalnewstoday

When the Covid-19 scare started in Nigeria a few week back, everyone went into a frenzy. And the good ol’ ginger became a necessity because of it’s said nutritional components. Is it worth the hype?

Origin

Ginger originated from an Island Southeast Asia. It is a true cultigen (a plant species or variety known only in cultivation) and does not exist in its wild state. The most ancient evidence of its domestication is among the Austronesian peoples where it was among several species of ginger cultivated and exploited since ancient times. They cultivated other gingers including turmeric (Curcuma longa), white turmeric (Curcuma zedoaria), and bitter ginger (Zingiber zerumbet). The rhizomes and the leaves were used to flavor food or eaten directly. The leaves were also used to weave mats. Aside from these uses, ginger had religious significance among Austronesians.

About

Raw ginger is composed of 79% water, 18% carbohydrates, 2% protein, and 1% fat (table). In 100 grams, raw ginger supplies 80 Calories and contains moderate amounts of vitamin B6 (12% of the Daily Value, DV) and the dietary minerals, magnesium (12% DV) and manganese (11% DV), but otherwise is low in nutrient content (table).

When used as a spice powder in a common serving amount of one tablespoon (5 grams), ground dried ginger (9% water) provides negligible content of essential nutrients, with the exception of manganese (70% DV).

What Ginger Can/Cannot Do

Very many health benefits, but there are also insufficient evidence for a few of the points listed below about Ginger:

 

  1. It can reduce your risk of diabetes.

Scientists have linked some active compounds in ginger with improvements in insulin and metabolism. That said, if you’re at risk for diabetes, adding extra to sugary gingerbread cookies won’t do you any favors! Keep both dried and fresh ginger on-hand for flavoring smoothies and veggie-based stir-frys and soups. While some chemical compounds in ginger may decrease over time, the drying process enhances other beneficial ones.

 

  1. It’s a natural way to relieve period pain.

Out of all of the research done on ginger’s pain-relieving properties, results show it helps with menstrual pain the most. Sipping ginger tea can also soothe nausea during that time of the month. However, if you usually take acetaminophen or ibuprofen, it may not work as well. Check with your doc before trying any supplement in extract or pill form, since it may interact with other medications you’re taking.

 

  1. It’s an anti-inflammatory.

Like other produce, nuts, seeds, beans, and whole grains, ginger contains antioxidant-like compounds called phytonutrients that may reduce cell damage. The root can also prevent inflammation from starting by reducing cell-signaling activity. With that in mind, adding ginger to already good-for-you, nutrient-dense meals is the key to unlocking those properties.

 

  1. It can settle an upset stomach.

The idea that ginger can help with some light tummy trouble isn’t new. In fact, research has linked multiple digestive benefits to ginger, specifically acting on parts of your GI tract responsible for feelings of nausea, stomach upset, and vomiting. It may also help move food from the stomach to the small intestine for digestion and absorption. That said, ginger cannot prevent food poisoning or counteract ingestion of a harmful substance, so contact your physician ASAP if something requires urgent medical attention.

 

  1. It can also curb morning sickness.

And speaking of an upset stomach, pregnant women in particular should take note: Ginger may help reduce symptoms of morning sickness! In fact, research supports the safety and efficacy of ginger during pregnancy, with some improvement in symptoms when compared to a placebo.

 

  1. It may help prevent heart disease.

The same anti-inflammatory compounds in ginger can also reduce the risk of chronic disease. A 2016 review even linked regular ginger intake with lower cholesterol and blood sugar compared to a placebo. But just like diabetes, eating ginger can’t offset an otherwise poor diet high in saturated fat and added sugar. You’ll still have to consume more veggies, 100% whole grains, lean proteins, fish, legumes, and beans in order to reduce your risk.

 

  1. It may lower your risk of cancer.

The cell-protecting properties of ginger can lower the long-term risk of certain cancers. That’s because the spice and other flavorings may reduce cellular activity that causes DNA changes, cell death, and proliferation of cancer cells. It could also help sensitize tumors to treatments like chemo and radiation. While ginger’s not a cure-all for any chronic disease, using it regularly with loads of other spices and plant-based foods can help benefit health overall.

 

  1. It can help you lose weight.

Some small studies have linked ginger intake — when combined with other plant extracts — to some benefits in weight loss. And there’s definitely some promising animal research linking ginger to weight management. But as with anything else, ginger is no magic weight-loss pill! Other components of a healthy, balanced diet matter just as much when it comes to losing weight and keeping it off.

 

  1. Osteoarthritis.

Most research shows that taking ginger by mouth can slightly reduce pain in some people with osteoarthritis. There is some evidence that taking ginger by mouth works as well as certain drugs such as ibuprofen and diclofenac for pain in hip and knee osteoarthritis. But conflicting results exist. Some early research also shows that ginger gel applied to the knee or ginger oil massaged into the knee can also relieve osteoarthritis pain.

 

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD.

A lung disease that makes it harder to breathe.  Research shows that taking two capsules of a specific combination product (AKL1, AKL International Ltd) containing ginger twice daily for 8 weeks does not improve respiratory symptoms in people with COPD.

 

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome or ARDS.

 A sudden and serious lung condition. Research suggests that administering 120 mg of ginger extract daily for up to 21 days increases the number of days without ventilator support, the amount of nutrients consumed, and reduces the time spent in intensive care units in people with sudden respiratory system a failure. However, ginger extract does not seem to affect death rates in people with this condition.

 

  1. High blood pressure.

Drinking black tea with ginger might lower blood pressure by a small amount in people with diabetes and high blood pressure.

 

Ginger can be a delicious way to flavor any anti-inflammatory diet plan. Plus, swapping the spice for added salt, sugar, or saturated fat may help us lose unwanted pounds! Use ginger for seasoning veggie-heavy meals and snacks, not solely for health benefits.